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Pre-U Tuition at Tutor House

April 21, 2012

Pre-U is a relatively new qualification, born in 2008 and regulated by the University of Cambridge International Examinations, it already has a large number of secondary education providers switching to Pre-U from A-Level.

Why?

Well there are a number of reasons. Firstly, universities want to see ‘better equipped’ students, with a more independent style of learning. 140 universities across Britain now accept Pre-U. These include Cardiff, Durham, Imperial and Newcastle University. Secondly, unlike A-Levels the Pre-U grading scale is divided into three separate bands; Pass, Merit and Distinction. In fact a D1 grade (Distinction 1) extends beyond the A* grade, i.e it carries more merit.

Who?

A mixture of private independent, grammar and comprehensive schools and sixth-form colleges are offering Pre-U. Schools including Oundle, Dulwich, Watford Grammar, Charterhouse and Westminster. The general consensus amongst these Schools is that A-Levels are becoming devalued, especially when universities are considering applicants. Universities are looking for a new avenue to pick the top students. It is becoming increasingly difficult for Universities to distinguish between two students who have the same A-Level results. Personal statements of course help, a good personal statement is key. But results are more important and the introduction of the Pre-U examinations could be what the Universities will start to use to separate similarly graded students.

The Pre-U course helps to prepare students for University ‘better’ than A-Levels do.

Contact tutor house for advice and tutoring excellence.

Residential course London and U.K

Dear All,

Well, after busy, successful (see our testimonials Testimonials at tutor house) and enjoyable Easter revision courses, tutor house is back with a bang! This time it’s our residential courses which are taking the tutoring industry by storm. We are offering a diverse and interesting array of residential courses. Our courses are specifically tailored to the individual pupils, there are many different option to consider when deciding the most appropriate residential course to undertake.

Tutors can travel with the student(s) and their families to location around the globe, where the atmosphere is more relaxed and student usually feel comfortable in their own surroundings. Residential tuition usually last for a week, however, we have had clients book tutors in from two days to three weeks, residential tuition is completely flexible. Tuition can last three to eight hours a day.

Another residential course option is for tutors to remain in the U.K and tutor privately at the students own home. Again the tutoring course is completely flexible and hours, days and weeks are entirely up to the client.

Finally students have the option to take part in our summer revision course. This is similar to our Easter and Christmas revision course, but focuses more on the transition from GCSE to AS level and indeed from AS level to A level. Transition Programme at tutor house.
Tutors focus on an introduction to the A level course and help student to understand and interpret questions, based on model answers.

Our residential tuition courses focus manly on the following subjects:

Mathematics, Further Maths, Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Economics and Psychology. However, tutor house also offers a range of other residential tuition subjects.

Do please contact tutor house for further information on our upcoming residential courses over the summer.

Residential courses London

April 17, 2012

Dear All,

Well, after busy, successful (see our testimonials Testimonials at tutor house) and enjoyable Easter revision courses, tutor house is back with a bang! This time it’s our residential courses which are taking the tutoring industry by storm. We are offering a diverse and interesting array of residential courses.  Our courses are specifically tailored to the individual pupils, there are many different option to consider when deciding the most appropriate residential course to undertake.

Tutors can travel with the student(s) and their families to location around the globe, where the atmosphere is more relaxed and student usually feel comfortable in their own surroundings. Residential tuition usually last for a week, however, we have had clients book tutors in from two days to three weeks, residential tuition is completely flexible. Tuition can last three to eight hours a day.

Another residential course option is for tutors to remain in the U.K and tutor privately at the students own home. Again the tutoring course is completely flexible and hours, days and weeks are entirely up to the client.

Finally students have the option to take part in our summer revision course. This is similar to our Easter and Christmas revision course, but focuses more on the transition from GCSE to AS level and indeed from AS level to A level. Transition Programme at tutor house.
Tutors focus on an introduction to the A level course and help student to understand and interpret questions, based on model answers.

Our residential tuition courses focus manly on the following subjects:

Mathematics, Further Maths, Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Economics and Psychology. However, tutor house also offers a range of other residential tuition subjects.

Do please contact tutor house for further information on our upcoming residential courses over the summer.

Very many people go through their whole lives….

April 7, 2012

Very many people go through their whole lives having no real sense of what their talents may be, or if they have any to speak of.” (Ken Robinson)

Sir Ken Robinson gave talk on the future of our education system and he believes our system needs to change.  See this inspiring talk in full by clicking the link:

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution.html

He argues the case that to just reform our education system is not good enough.  We need a revolution!  But why?  Many would argue that education in this country is at its peak with more and more students achieving top grades at A-Levels and then going on to university. Sir Robinson takes a more creative view of educating young people and rather than looking at the results tables – he comments on the effects our education system is having on young people.

Sir Robinson believes that the model of education we have in place does not help students find their talents and what they are truly good at.  He likens the education system to the ‘fast food model’ of eating.  i.e. – everything is customised and standardised with no variation between restaurants.  Does a 16 year old GCSE student living in a small village in Cornwall have the same interests and life experiences as a 16 year old GCSE student in London?  The answer is most certainly no, and yet we educate them in exactly the same way.

Sir Ken Robinson is a creativity expert and his vision for the future will obviously take time to filter down into how we teach in schools.  I would like to think that the core values of tutor house are working towards his aims for education in the future.

Our Tutors in Fulham

March 20, 2012

Tuition really can be easy and fun ,

now of course that’s easier said than done,

and we’re not saying that our tutors are ‘super-tutors’

but they are certainly more helpful than facebook or computers.

They make sure that you understand your work,

which is better than sitting at home going berserk;

our tutors help you understand the syllabus through and through,

giving you confidence in class, being able to answer questions out of the blue.

Tutors are not here to set you lots of things to do,

they’re here to help build confidence and help mentor you,

they’re here to take your mind off facebook and C.O.D

which I know sounds a little bit odd,

but you need to get your head down and study

and that is where a tutor can be your buddy,

helping you through these tricky exams and tests,

they’ve been there before so they know what’s best.

So keep your head down and work like a little mouse,

if you need any help just contact tutor house.

Read More about Revision Courses at tutor house»

A-Levels at tutor house

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is there a lack of Qualified Language Tutors and Teachers?

March 13, 2012

There has been a huge increase in the demand for qualified language tutors and teachers in the last few weeks, which seems to be across all language subjects. These include French, Spanish, German and Russian.

This seems to be due to two main factors:

1) In October last year there was a call for more languages to be learn in all Schools and Colleges across the country, in an attempt to increase the number of people (students) speaking a second and even a third language. Dr Seldon of Wellington School said if the decline in children sitting languages continues to drop we will move from “Great Britain to Little Britain.” Others include Mr Gove implied that languages should be brought back as compulsory subjects at GCSE level.

2) A drop in Students sitting languages and consequently fewer student studying languages at University.

But now those tutors, teachers and lecturers who may have struggled to find jobs, will now have a great opportunity to take part in the new language demand. In fact the number of students entered for languages this year has shot up 22% to 52%. A huge surge.

Having a tutor can be best way to get up to scratch with your French, German or Spanish before the summer exams.

So if you need any tutoring, help or advice in languages then contact tutor house.
GCSE courses at tutor house
A-Level courses at tutor house

Can Exercise really help Academic Performance.

March 5, 2012

Can exercise help a child’s motivation, concentration and communication skills?

Well, firstly, what are the benefits of exercise? Exercise releases adrenaline into the blood stream which has a metabolic effect on the human body, this means it increases blood pressure and blood flow and raises heart rate. The basic advantage of this is that blood circulates the body at a faster rate, providing the working muscles and the brain with oxygen and nutrients. So that’s good for everyone!

An increase in oxygen supply to the brain can help decrease stress and anxiety, which as most parents will tell you are two common complaints they have about their children. In addition bouts of physical exercise can help a child to concentrate, again this is due to an increase in blood flow and oxygen.

The stress hormone cortisol is released into the bloodstream during periods of stress, we’re mainly talking about exams and homework, but of course the stressor could be family life, school, friends, teachers and so on.

High levels of cortisol can have detrimental effects on the body, it suppresses the immune system, decreases bone formation and can even inhibit memory retrieval and storage. Exercise helps to reduce cortisol levels in to blood stream.

Research and studies into this area are increasing, they suggest that exercise can help build confidence in dyslexic students. Other studies suggest that there is a strong relationship between physical activity and classroom performance, i.e the more time a child spends exercising the more likely they are to achieve good marks. Huffington post article on this subject

So the general consensus is that exercise (and a change is diet) should boost academic performance in children.

 

12 tips for IELTS success

December 19, 2011

  1. Answer IELTS listening questions in the order they appear on the question paper, looking only at the question that relate to the part being played. Remember that the questions normally follow the order of the information played in the recording.
  2. Make sure you use the time in between sections to familiarise yourself with the questions so you can try and predict the information you will be listening out for, e.g. a time / date / place. If you are familiar with the questions you should be able to recognise if you have missed an answer so you can move on and listen for the next piece of information.
  3. At the end of the recording you have time to transfer your answers to the answer sheet. Be sure to check your grammar and spelling because you will lose marks if you are inaccurate.
  4. In IELTS academic reading you do not have long to read three texts so don’t try to understand every word precisely. You may not be tested on that part of the text anyway.
  5. Have a brief look at the questions before you read the text. It’s always advisable to read with a purpose! For example, if one of the questions asks you to match paragraphs with headings, you can write a few words about what the paragraph deals with as you read to help you identify the correct heading.
  6. The IELTS instructions might give you a word limit, e.g, ‘use no more than 3 words.’ Keep to this by avoiding unnecessary words in your answer. Articles, i.e. the/a/an, count as one word so if they are not needed for the sentence to make sense then leave them out.
  7. In IELTS academic writing you must always keep to the topic of the question and answer it specifically. Don’t try to prepare sections of an essay before the exam as this will be obvious to the examiner.
  8. The best way to prepare for IELTS writing (task 2) is to read widely about current affairs and then practise writing sample IELTS questions. Read newspapers and magazines whenever you get the chance. This will help you to form ideas for your essays.
  9. If you write less than 150 words for task 1 and 250 words for task 2 you will lose marks. There is no strict word limit for either task but try to stick to the suggested timing so hopefully you will have an opportunity to check you work for spelling and grammar.
  10. In the IELTS speaking exam, don’t prepare speeches on topics. You need to make sure you answer the specific question you are asked. Remember, you are not being tested on your general knowledge but on your ability to communicate well. Slow down and try to organise your ideas in a logical way.
  11. When the examiner asks you a question try to give as much detail as possible. Explain at least one point and remember to give your opinion. The examiner wants to hear you talk so give him plenty of opportunity!
A-Level pass rates rise while University places tighten.

August 18, 2011

A-Level results have risen for the 29th consecutive year which is great news for students but it does mean they now face an even tougher battle for university places. The pass rate for 2011 has increased overall, however, there has been no significant change in A* and A grades for A-Level results. Competition among students applying for medical school and biomedical science has been the most fierce with a large number of students missing out on places. In addition, with tuition fees rising in September 2012, the intense race for a university place has reached new heights.

On results day many students had serious problems trying to log onto UCAS to find out their results. The UCAS website was down for a long period of time so students were unable to access their results. This impeded the students who didn’t get the grades they needed and wanted to go through clearing.

Despite this, many private tutees got the grades they needed so tutor house would like to say a big congratulations to those students who are going on to their chosen universities!

For those students who did not achieve the grades they had hoped for – don’t panic! There are many options available to you. Any students or parents who would like some advice on what to do next, please call tutor house and we will be happy to help.

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